Blog Archives

Mob Mentality

mob-mentality

We’ve all heard of the mob mentality, where opinions and ideas of individual people are influenced by that of a larger group ( hence, the mob. ) This can occur in many ways, there is a mob mentality when it comes to sports, particularly in football / soccer ( I’m certain the same applies likewise to American Football and NHL ) where people worship teams to the point of obsession, sometimes even going as far as violence because of it.

Now, don’t get me wrong, the vast majority of supporters are good people, it’s the small few that mess everything else up for everyone and give them a bad name. That is a bad example of the mob mentality. Unfortunately, all my experience of the mob mentality is negative, giving me the impression that it really is a bad thing.

For one thing, you are selling out on your individuality and becoming part of the Borg collective by subscribing to the mob mentality. Yes, I know it’s hard to resist, especially when seems like everyone else is doing it and / or it seems like it’s the cool thing to do. Hell, I’ve being through that conflict as well in the past when I choose to not smoke or drink in Secondary School ( I didn’t drink until I was 21 ) and saw what seemed like to be EVERYONE ELSE doing either one or both of these things. Felt horrible, I may tell you but I got over it and figured I really shouldn’t care and just my own thing, my own way.

Looking at the fighting game scene that I’m a part of, there is a very clear and blatant example of mob mentality from this year that I got caught up in. Back in February, Capcom released a new fighting game called Street Fighter X Tekken. The game was clearly rushed, suffered from numerous bugs and worst of all, there was a massive DLC fiasco around launch time involving locked characters that people would have to pay for and wouldn’t be released until October ( this was later changed to July. ) All this combined to create one hell of angry mob, which I got sucked into myself and became rather passionate about hating the game.

SFXT Logo

‘ Hate! Hate! Hate! Rah, it’s cool to hate this! Look at me roar! ‘ Actually, it’s not really that bad and doesn’t deserve all the hate. Except Zangief, he can go die in a fire.

Until the end of the summer, when I decided to give the game another chance. Now, don’t get me wrong, there are some serious flaws but I found it fun, in spite of it’s flaws, it was fun. I changed my mind about the game, stopped hating on it and realized that I had foolishly fallen into the trap of hating the game because it seemed like everyone else did. In short, I had being a victim of mob mentality.

Following that, reading comments on news articles relating to the game became a sickening experience. With people frankly shitting on the game just for the sake of it, even when Capcom announced they were actively trying to fix things to make it a better, more solid game with a free update in December. They screamed for them to fix the game and kept on screaming when Capcom said they were fixing it!

I haven’t being this sickened by the mob mentality in a long time but I guess the only reason I even am sickened by it is because I was for a while, apart of this mob. Only I eventually saw through it for what is and was now aware of it. So, what I have taken away from this is the need for awareness of things. Awareness helps in these sort of things, to see through the mob and be able to come to your own conclusions about things rather than letting the mob do that for you.

At least that is my view on things, being a bit of an eye opener and made me a bit more humble, me thinks.

People Who Inspire Me – Juicebox Abel

No Self Promo ChallengeThis post is a part of a series of posts I will be making every Thursday for the month of February as my contribution to the No Self Promo Challenge. Despite the title, we can decide our level of involvement. As part of my contribution, I decided to write a series of posts about people who inspire me or have otherwise have a positive impact on me and I feel more people should be made aware of.

Eric Albino, better known as Juicebox Abel, is an American based fighting game player, best known for acting out special moves in the ‘ Street Fighter ‘ series of games. These are called Juicebox dances and pretty funny to watch, especially when you see the reactions of some of the other players who fall victim to them. The way he puts it is that video games should be fun and that game, after all is a silly exaggerated cartoon and he treats it as such.

However, there is actually more to Juicebox than this. For one thing, he strives to help others improve their general fighting game skills. He previously had a podcast called Juicy Bits where he would go over various scenarios that a typical player would find themselves stuck in and provide tips on how to overcome these and improve your game.

He also recently started doing podcasts which are called ‘ Juicy Bits – Straight From the Box. ‘ While he generally just plays various video games ( most notably King of Fighters 13, Street Fighter 4 and various other miscellaneous games when he is bored ) he is willing to dispense some tough love if someone asks him for advice on how to improve. I have done this myself because I knew I could get something truthful out of him rather than some wishy washy bias from my local players.

He also finds it very annoying that the fact that so many players, particularly those who play online a lot, almost always do the same thing over and over, which owing to less than stellar internet infrastructure, results in them wining a lot. This does NOT help them as in an offline setting, these same people will get slaughtered by people who know what they are doing. He merely wishes for a more progressive mindset.

He is also very much himself, he doesn’t feel the need to pretend or put up any fake nonsense to make him look tough or bad ass ( trust me, people who try to act tough and bad-ass just end up looking like ass-holes, which is something I don’t particularly like and also puts off a lot of people. ) He simply himself and a lot of people like him for that, especially when you consider he is more than willing to give advice to help others improve and become better players in the long run.

This is Juicebox Abel and he is my favourite fighting game player, he inspires me to be myself always and to become a better fighting game player.